top of page

Objectives of the 3rd Year PhD in International Relations and Diplomacy

Objectives:

Apply
  1. Complete Dissertation Research and Writing:

    • Finalize data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

    • Write and refine dissertation chapters, ensuring coherence and academic rigor.

    • Prepare the dissertation for defense and publication.

  2. Deepen Specialized Knowledge:

    • Engage in advanced seminars that cover cutting-edge topics in International Relations and Diplomacy.

    • Apply theoretical frameworks to complex global issues through case studies.

    • Develop expertise in specific areas relevant to the dissertation.

  3. Enhance Research Methodologies:

    • Utilize advanced qualitative and quantitative research methods.

    • Integrate interdisciplinary approaches to enrich dissertation research.

    • Critically evaluate sources and methodologies to ensure robust findings.

  4. Professional Development:

    • Present research findings at academic conferences and workshops.

    • Network with scholars and professionals in the field to build academic and professional relationships.

    • Develop skills in grant writing, public speaking, and academic publishing.

  5. Teaching and Academic Service:

    • Gain teaching experience by serving as a teaching assistant or instructor for undergraduate courses.

    • Participate in departmental committees and contribute to academic governance.

    • Mentor junior students and assist them with research projects.

  6. Prepare for Academic and Non-Academic Careers:

    • Develop a professional portfolio, including a CV, teaching philosophy, and research statement.

    • Explore career opportunities within academia, government, international organizations, and the private sector.

    • Acquire skills in job market preparation, including interview techniques and job application strategies.

Specific Learning Outcomes

By the end of the third year, students will:

  1. Research and Dissertation:

    • Have a nearly complete or fully written dissertation that contributes original knowledge to the field.

    • Demonstrate the ability to conduct independent, high-quality research.

    • Be prepared to defend their dissertation before a committee of experts.

  2. Specialized Knowledge:

    • Exhibit deep understanding of specialized topics within International Relations and Diplomacy.

    • Critically analyze contemporary global issues using advanced theoretical and methodological tools.

  3. Professional Skills:

    • Successfully present research findings at national and international conferences.

    • Publish articles in peer-reviewed journals or edited volumes.

    • Engage in meaningful professional development activities that enhance career readiness.

  4. Teaching and Mentoring:

    • Effectively teach and engage undergraduate students in International Relations and Diplomacy courses.

    • Contribute to the academic community through service and mentorship.

  5. Career Preparation:

    • Be equipped with the skills and knowledge necessary for securing academic or non-academic positions.

    • Have a clear career plan and be prepared for the job market.

These objectives ensure that third-year PhD students in International Relations and Diplomacy are well-prepared for the final stages of their doctoral journey, are able to make significant contributions to their field, and are ready to embark on successful careers in academia or beyond.

Third Year PhD in International Relations and Diplomacy Curriculum

Third-year courses for PhD program in International Relations and Diplomacy at the United States Institute of Leadership and Diplomacy involves focusing primarily on dissertation work, advanced research, professional development, and teaching responsibilities. Here's a detailed outline including courses, case studies, schedule, and hours.

Total Annual Hours: 1,500

Breakdown of Hours:

  1. Dissertation Research and Writing: 800 hours

  2. Advanced Seminars and Special Topics: 200 hours

  3. Teaching and Academic Service: 200 hours

  4. Professional Development and Conferences: 150 hours

  5. Independent Study and Reading: 150 hours

1. Dissertation Research and Writing: 800 hours

  • Fall Semester:

    • Data Collection and Analysis: 150 hours

    • Writing Dissertation Chapters (4-6): 150 hours

    • Revision and Feedback: 100 hours

  • Spring Semester:

    • Continued Data Collection and Analysis: 150 hours

    • Completing Dissertation Writing: 150 hours

    • Final Revisions and Submission Preparation: 100 hours

2. Advanced Seminars and Special Topics: 200 hours

  • Fall Semester:

    • Special Topics Seminar 1: 75 hours

    • Case Study Analysis: 25 hours

  • Spring Semester:

    • Special Topics Seminar 2: 75 hours

    • Case Study Analysis: 25 hours

3. Teaching and Academic Service: 200 hours

  • Teaching Assistantships or Lectures:

    • 5 hours per week x 15 weeks per semester = 75 hours per semester

    • Total: 75 hours per semester x 2 semesters = 150 hours

  • Academic Service (e.g., committee work, peer reviewing):

    • 50 hours per year

4. Professional Development and Conferences: 150 hours

  • Conferences and Workshops:

    • Attending and presenting at conferences: 40 hours

    • Professional development workshops (e.g., grant writing, job market preparation): 40 hours

  • Networking and Engagement:

    • Departmental and interdisciplinary events: 70 hours

5. Independent Study and Reading: 150 hours

  • Independent Reading and Study:

    • Reading academic journals, books, and reports: 5 hours per week x 30 weeks = 150 hours

Detailed Course Outline:

Course 1: Advanced Seminar on Global Security Issues

  • Duration: Fall Semester, 75 hours

  • Content:

    • In-depth study of contemporary security challenges: terrorism, cyber warfare, nuclear proliferation

    • Case studies on global security crises: Syrian Civil War, North Korean nuclear program, cybersecurity threats

  • Key References:

    • Collins, A. (Ed.). (2016). Contemporary Security Studies. Oxford University Press.

    • Nye, J. S., & Welch, D. A. (2017). Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation. Pearson.

  • Assessment:

    • Seminar participation, presentation on a security issue, and a research paper.

Course 2: Special Topics in International Political Economy

  • Duration: Spring Semester, 75 hours

  • Content:

    • Examination of global trade policies, financial crises, and economic development

    • Case studies on trade wars, the 2008 financial crisis, and the Belt and Road Initiative

  • Key References:

    • Oatley, T. (2018). International Political Economy. Routledge.

    • Frieden, J., Lake, D., & Broz, J. (2016). International Political Economy: Perspectives on Global Power and Wealth. Norton.

  • Assessment:

    • Seminar participation, presentation on an IPE topic, and a research paper.

Case Studies for Seminars:

  • Global Security Issues:

    • Syrian Civil War: Analysis of international responses and implications for global security.

    • North Korean Nuclear Program: Diplomatic challenges and international sanctions.

    • Cybersecurity Threats: Examination of state and non-state actors in cyber warfare.

  • International Political Economy:

    • US-China Trade War: Causes, consequences, and future implications.

    • 2008 Financial Crisis: Analysis of causes, global impacts, and policy responses.

    • Belt and Road Initiative: Economic and geopolitical implications for participating countries.

Weekly Schedule:

Fall Semester:

  • Monday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Dissertation Data Collection and Analysis (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Advanced Seminar on Global Security Issues (3 hours)

  • Tuesday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Teaching Assistantship (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Dissertation Writing (3 hours)

  • Wednesday:

    • 10:00-12:00: Departmental Seminar (2 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Independent Study and Reading (3 hours)

  • Thursday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Case Study Analysis (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Dissertation Revision and Feedback (3 hours)

  • Friday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Professional Development Workshop (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Networking and Engagement (3 hours)

  • Saturday:

    • Open for conference attendance, additional reading, or catch-up work.

Spring Semester:

  • Monday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Continued Data Collection and Analysis (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Special Topics Seminar in International Political Economy (3 hours)

  • Tuesday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Teaching Assistantship (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Dissertation Writing (3 hours)

  • Wednesday:

    • 10:00-12:00: Departmental Seminar (2 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Independent Study and Reading (3 hours)

  • Thursday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Case Study Analysis (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Dissertation Final Revisions and Submission Preparation (3 hours)

  • Friday:

    • 9:00-12:00: Professional Development Workshop (3 hours)

    • 13:00-16:00: Networking and Engagement (3 hours)

  • Saturday:

    • Open for conference attendance, additional reading, or catch-up work.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the third year, PhD students in International Relations and Diplomacy will:

  1. Have made significant progress on their dissertation research and writing.

  2. Demonstrate advanced knowledge in specific areas of IR through specialized seminars.

  3. Apply case study methodologies to analyze complex international issues.

  4. Gain professional experience through teaching and academic service.

  5. Be actively engaged with the scholarly community and professional networks.

  6. Be prepared to present their research at academic conferences and publish in peer-reviewed journals.

This comprehensive outline ensures that third-year PhD students are well-prepared for the final stages of their dissertation, are deeply engaged in advanced research topics, and continue their professional development within the field of International Relations and Diplomacy.

Apply
bottom of page